kinggjayysshit:

heropirate:

Bob scrubbin’ your blog.

Thanks bob

kinggjayysshit:

heropirate:

Bob scrubbin’ your blog.

Thanks bob

My lil chimney sweeps. 😍

theatlantic:

My Students Don’t Know How To Have a Conversation

Recently I stood in front of my class, observing an all-too-familiar scene. Most of my students were covertly—or so they thought—pecking away at their smartphones under their desks, checking their Facebook feeds and texts.
As I called their attention, students’ heads slowly lifted, their eyes reluctantly glancing forward. I then cheerfully explained that their next project would practice a skill they all desperately needed: holding a conversation.
Several students looked perplexed. Others fidgeted in their seats, waiting for me to stop watching the class so they could return to their phones. Finally, one student raised his hand. “How is this going to work?” he asked. 
My junior English class had spent time researching different education issues. We had held whole-class discussions surrounding school reform issues and also practiced one-on-one discussions. Next, they would create podcasts in small groups, demonstrating their ability to communicate about the topics—the project represented a culminating assessment of their ability to speak about the issues in real time.
Even with plenty of practice, the task proved daunting to students. I watched trial runs of their podcasts frequently fall silent. Unless the student facilitator asked a question, most kids were unable to converse effectively. Instead of chiming in or following up on comments, they conducted rigid interviews. They shuffled papers and looked down at their hands. Some even reached for their phones—an automatic impulse and the last thing they should be doing.
Read more. [Image: Adam Fagen/Flickr]


So hold on, hold on. What the writer here is saying is that they forced their class to record themselves talking about things they probably don’t even care about in the first place and expected some degree of engagement and eloquence that they did not end up demonstrating. And that reason is because KIDS THESE DAYS AND THEIR ELECTRONICS? Am I summarizing that correctly?
Because I’ve worked with kids in this age group and they have no damn problem carrying a conversation. I’m at least 10 years older than the kids I’ve worked with and yet they had no problem talking to me like normal humans without their noses in their phones. I had no problem getting them to talk. They communicated clearly and freely. Wow, it’s almost like kids these days are like… people? What??
And if kids are people, and people generally don’t like being forced to talk about shit they don’t care about… then would that mean that kids, like people, have no problem talking about things as long as it’s relevant and interesting to them? WHAT? WHAT AM I SAYING? AM I CRAZY?
I’m sick of “kids these days!!” writing. You’re lazy and boring and you obviously don’t know a damn thing about your students.

theatlantic:

My Students Don’t Know How To Have a Conversation

Recently I stood in front of my class, observing an all-too-familiar scene. Most of my students were covertly—or so they thought—pecking away at their smartphones under their desks, checking their Facebook feeds and texts.

As I called their attention, students’ heads slowly lifted, their eyes reluctantly glancing forward. I then cheerfully explained that their next project would practice a skill they all desperately needed: holding a conversation.

Several students looked perplexed. Others fidgeted in their seats, waiting for me to stop watching the class so they could return to their phones. Finally, one student raised his hand. “How is this going to work?” he asked. 

My junior English class had spent time researching different education issues. We had held whole-class discussions surrounding school reform issues and also practiced one-on-one discussions. Next, they would create podcasts in small groups, demonstrating their ability to communicate about the topics—the project represented a culminating assessment of their ability to speak about the issues in real time.

Even with plenty of practice, the task proved daunting to students. I watched trial runs of their podcasts frequently fall silent. Unless the student facilitator asked a question, most kids were unable to converse effectively. Instead of chiming in or following up on comments, they conducted rigid interviews. They shuffled papers and looked down at their hands. Some even reached for their phones—an automatic impulse and the last thing they should be doing.

Read more. [Image: Adam Fagen/Flickr]

So hold on, hold on. What the writer here is saying is that they forced their class to record themselves talking about things they probably don’t even care about in the first place and expected some degree of engagement and eloquence that they did not end up demonstrating. And that reason is because KIDS THESE DAYS AND THEIR ELECTRONICS? Am I summarizing that correctly?

Because I’ve worked with kids in this age group and they have no damn problem carrying a conversation. I’m at least 10 years older than the kids I’ve worked with and yet they had no problem talking to me like normal humans without their noses in their phones. I had no problem getting them to talk. They communicated clearly and freely. Wow, it’s almost like kids these days are like… people? What??

And if kids are people, and people generally don’t like being forced to talk about shit they don’t care about… then would that mean that kids, like people, have no problem talking about things as long as it’s relevant and interesting to them? WHAT? WHAT AM I SAYING? AM I CRAZY?

I’m sick of “kids these days!!” writing. You’re lazy and boring and you obviously don’t know a damn thing about your students.

dunshine:

I want to thank you so much for letting me change my journal into songs, and then being so kind when you hear the words that I have to say.I want you to know, tonight, whatever it is you’re going through, whatever you brought to the building tonight, you’re not alone in what you’re going through, I promise. I promise. Music can do that. It can make things make sense for moments at a time. That’s why we listen. We have one more song for you, and if you would be so kind to participate, just let loose. This is your moment to leave everything here tonight that you need to. 

tyler’s speech before trees. louisville, ky. [|-/]

I’m really reallyyyy excited to see them again so soon.

theperks:


jake-benge:

rumblefishx:


I live by the beach and this little guy just popped by for a visit 

EXCUSE ME

Excuse me, do you have a moment to talk about our lord, Poseidon? 

I would just immediately start crying


This is my only dream.

theperks:

jake-benge:

rumblefishx:

I live by the beach and this little guy just popped by for a visit 

EXCUSE ME

Excuse me, do you have a moment to talk about our lord, Poseidon? 

I would just immediately start crying

This is my only dream.

The sun has grown so very, very old. How long cold, fading death? How long? Welcome to Night Vale.

Fall Out Boy - Pavlove
36 plays

Fall Out Boy - Pavlove

loserific:

I wanted to practice daisy and stem stitches, but also stitch Batman… 😬😬 #embroidery #batman

loserific:

I wanted to practice daisy and stem stitches, but also stitch Batman… 😬😬 #embroidery #batman

valencing:

oh well, at least zayn looked good

-ancient one direction proverb

You can carry a knife and still trust everyone.

Carry it in your mouth.

Everytime you open it,
We await the sharpening noise of worship.

Cry out into the darkness
The sermon that doesn’t cease:
You cannot be abandoned.
You can only be released.

Church of the Broken Axe Handle, by Derrick Brown.
fawnvelveteen:

Lawrence Schiller, Portrait of Barbra Streisand for On a Clear Day You Can See Forever directed by Vicente Minnnelli, 1970

fawnvelveteen:

Lawrence Schiller, Portrait of Barbra Streisand for On a Clear Day You Can See Forever directed by Vicente Minnnelli, 1970

interquast:

its a metaphor, u see. u put the killing thing in ur itunes library but u dont give it the power to kill u. 
ha ha just kidding im dead inside

interquast:

its a metaphor, u see. u put the killing thing in ur itunes library but u dont give it the power to kill u. 

ha ha just kidding im dead inside

nevver:

Lisa Congdon